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Living in Washington, D.C.

Washington, D.C., the nation's hub of all three branches of government, is filled with bustling tourists, popular attractions, iconic landmarks and, of course, the president of the United States. So it's no surprise that people of many different backgrounds call this city home. Further, the nation's capital is not just into the serious business of politics, since things can be quite laid back with Washington, D.C.,'s numerous parks, cafés, beer halls and sports and entertainment venues.

Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C.

Meandering Through the District

Everyday living in Washington, D.C., situated along the banks of the Potomac River, can involve a flurry of activities. After all, there's never a shortage of things to do. For a good view of the cityscape, you'd only have to hop on the D.C. Circulator, which takes you on a 13-mile journey around the city and offers a glimpse of popular destinations like The White House, the National Mall and even Georgetown. This is also the most affordable way to get a feel of the city's busy streets lined with swank hotels, boutique shops and even artisan street vendors. Night owls can head over to Adams Morgan, U Street or Georgetown to experience Washington's robust nightlife scene.

If you're digging for some outdoor activities, you'll discover the National Arboretum, Smithsonian's National Zoo, Rock Creek Park and the National Mall are the places to be. Outdoor and indoor fun are always available. While Washington, D.C., is the choice destination of 16 million tourists every year, it's easy to see why locals are proud to call this home: beyond the looming landmarks, venerable hotels and rich history, this is a city rife with almost tangible energy.

Washington Monument in Washington, D.C.

Housing Options in the District

There's a treasure trove of affordable row houses clustered in urban areas and neighborhoods like Bloomingdale and Capitol Hill. For those who are looking for more recently built homes, the city is also seeing new developments across its neighborhoods. Detached, single-family houses are also in the mix for those who don't mind spending serious money on Washington, D.C., real estate. Whatever your housing preference and budget is, you'll find there's a property ready to welcome you home in the District.


Location

Getting There & Around

 

What Locals Love

Don't Miss It

  • Visit the National Mall after dark to take in the beauty of the monuments and memorials lit up in the evening.
  • Become a member of the Smithsonian National Zoo where special events, such as ZooFiesta, Boo at the Zoo, ZooLights, lectures and much more, are held throughout the year.
  • Keep an eye on the weather in the winter months – when it snows, residents gather for impromptu snowball fights in the DuPont Circle neighborhood or, if approved by the U.S. National Park Service, go sledding on the lawn of the Capitol Building.

Top Neighborhood Spots



Homes

Washington Real Estate at a Glance

  • 2,372 Homes Sold*
  • 73 Avg. Days on Market*
  • $572,000 Median Price*

*over last 3 months

Find Your Home in Washington

There Are 2,958 Properties Available in Washington, DC

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